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Random Scientific Whims

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Skygate 911 - Full Film [15 Aug 2014|12:26pm]

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[great minds think alike]

American 77 Final Maneuver [06 Aug 2014|05:51pm]

ext_2702629
[great minds think alike]

Newton Laws on 9 11 [05 Aug 2014|10:00pm]

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1 beautiful mind| [great minds think alike]

01 - Broken News [04 Aug 2014|08:20pm]

ext_2702629
[great minds think alike]

A question [09 Jul 2011|06:55pm]

telemann


In films of nuclear tests, you typically see these cloud formations that appear a split second after the bomb explodes. What's causing this? My initial hunch is something about a sudden increase in temperature in the air above and around the bomb. In some videos you see these long stringy ribbon like clouds from the air (it can't be debris because the mushroom cloud is not even completely formed). Thanks!
12 beautiful minds| [great minds think alike]

The ancients and their understanding of "science" and the tension with religion [15 Jun 2011|04:27pm]

telemann
There's an interesting debate about the historical evolution of science within the ancient world and the tension between "science" and "religion." Some of this stems from a big argument over Carl Sagan's understanding that religious mobs destroyed the Library of Alexandria and murdered its director Hypatia. My experiences are that it seems religious minded people try to soft pedal any notion that science existed as science as we understand it, but I'm curious if anyone has some thoughts.
1 beautiful mind| [great minds think alike]

Any statistics whizzes around? [27 Nov 2010|03:11pm]

telemann
I got an A in the class in college, but I'm not sure how I would go about getting an answer to this question, or maybe it's a different kind of math.

I'm working on a composer, who I have a hunch, a lot of music for some reason vanished. He wrote 30 symphonies, and there are two unusual compositions he wrote called "Pieces," which have at least ONE movement from the symphonies. I have only looked at one so far, the other "Pieces" may have another movement or several from the symphonies.

Is there a way in statistics to ask a question along the lines: "Out of X movements in the symphonies, and because there are Y movements in the Pieces, it would seem likely that the movements in the Pieces that are NOT in the symphonies are from lost symphonies."

Thanks for any advice or suggestions.
1 beautiful mind| [great minds think alike]

Global warming...again [26 Jun 2010|06:07pm]

telemann
When it comes to global warming contrarians, when things are framed this way, I don't think nothing will convince them.
1 beautiful mind| [great minds think alike]

First Clock [15 Apr 2010|10:03am]

cassiopeia13
How did people come up with the idea of a 12 hour clock? or 24 hours in a day?

I say there has to be some logical reason. My math teacher says, "Just cause someone said so"
4 beautiful minds| [great minds think alike]

Metal Questions [22 Mar 2010|07:45pm]

cassiopeia13
Okay so, I work at a Blacksmith forge and started a Twitter "Metal Facts" page. So I have to come up with metal facts that are kindda cool. While watching History Channel, which isn't always accurate... okay lets be honest, is NEVER 100% accurate, they stated the following:

More steel in the US is used to make bottle caps than to manufacture automobile bodies.

I tried goggling this to see if it were true with no luck. So any thoughts?

My SECOND question, while looking for an answer to the first, I found THIS fact:

Intelligent people have more zinc and copper in their hair

It seems like it wouldn't be right, but on this page of "weird facts" the majority of the ones I know are all true, and the few I looked up pose to be true... so I'm wondering about it...

thanks
3 beautiful minds| [great minds think alike]

Is this Possible [08 Feb 2010|10:57am]

cassiopeia13
According to Discover Mag's 20 Things You Didn't Know About Gold, At one point, a Soviet Nuclear reactor turned lead nuculi into gold.

13 The eternal quest of alchemists—to change base metals into gold—was actually achieved to a certain degree in Soviet nuclear reactors, where radioactivity transformed some lead nuclei into gold.

http://discovermagazine.com/2007/dec/20-things-you-didn2019t-know-about-gold

So, my question is, is this plausable? we're having an argument at my work. I work for a blacksmith forge and our Twitter page is silly fun facts about metal and blacksmithing and such...

Thanks!
5 beautiful minds| [great minds think alike]

Global warming communities on LJ [10 Dec 2009|05:44pm]

telemann
Good day, does anyone have some recommendations for global warming communities on LJ? The obvious one is ran by a contrarian, so that's not for me. Thanks in advance!
[great minds think alike]

[01 Dec 2009|11:34pm]

ibishtar
So if Kip Thorne were to do a talk at your university, what would you ask him?
x-posted to physics .
[great minds think alike]

Abiogensis [04 Oct 2009|08:53pm]

telemann
I'd like to see abiogenesis reproduced in the lab just once!. Discussions about creationism and evolution always amaze me.
3 beautiful minds| [great minds think alike]

statistics [16 Sep 2009|10:36am]

telemann
I'm a music researcher and wondered if there is a branch of statistics that could help with a question I have. Telemann is a composer I work with a lot, and there are apparently about 125 orchestral suites that survive, but most of them survive in three unique libraries spread around Germany: Darmstadt, which has the bulk of them, then Dresden, then Schwerin). Historically we know there are missing suites because while the music doesn't always survive, there are musical catalogues with incipits.

Is there anyway using statistics, we can get an estimate of how many total missing suites there are? What would be the methods of getting that number?

Thanks so much
2 beautiful minds| [great minds think alike]

physiological question [20 Jul 2009|06:20am]

calysto
Women of comparable height and weight have more slender waists and abdomens than men... but how is that so, given that women have all the same abdominal organs that men have plus several extra?
5 beautiful minds| [great minds think alike]

Aluminum and cadmium corrosion [07 Jul 2009|06:36pm]

mopalia
I'm working on a project at the Henry Ford Museum, documenting and conserving the television collection.  Today we took the backs off a couple of vintage TVs and were stopped dead in our tracks by - corrosion.  We've figured out that the white fluffy stuff that shows up on rivets is aluminum and not toxic, but the head conservator is worried about this greenish powder that's showing up on some TV chassis.  The chassis generally seem to be aluminum, but some are covered in a greenish powder that's easy to dislodge - obviously some kind of breakdown product, but what?  She's afraid it's cadmium.  So the questions are -
What does cadmium break down into and how could you recognize it on visual inspection, and
Is there an easy test for the presence of cadmium?

And if it's not cadmium, what else would it be?
The time period for these TVs is roughly 1950s-1970s, so anything might have been used.  I don't have pictures of these yet;  we're hoping to work on them tomorrow and have to figure out how to approach them.
Any advice you can give would be appreciated.
6 beautiful minds| [great minds think alike]

Anyone out there, can you hear me now? [22 Jun 2009|04:51pm]

telemann
There is a new series on the History Channel "Life After Humans," showing how the things we've created will eventually break down and decay-- how long will it take to completely erase what humanity has made. One interesting sidebar was the Voyager probe. Eventually it will be torn apart by small metorites and asteriods. Apparently new research (ironically from the SETI project) indicates that our broadcast and television signals will break down after radiating out about 1 light year, the signal will decay to silence, meaning it wouldn't hit the nearest star system, much less any civilization on distant planets. Does anyone have more information about this? I was under the impression the signals would not decay unless something absorbed it.
5 beautiful minds| [great minds think alike]

Global warming stupid... [07 Jun 2009|01:19pm]

telemann
I'm not shocked at some of the stupid that's typed in this debate about global warming. The guy who makes the point about Mercury and Mars claims he has a Ph.D. in Math.
6 beautiful minds| [great minds think alike]

Jet airliners and their limits [02 Jun 2009|07:36pm]

telemann
In the news coverage about the Air France diaster, it's mentioned that most airliners will either go around large thunderstorms or go above them in an effort to avoid them. But apparently due to the unique wind currents near the ITCZ near the Equator, the storms there are very large with some topping out near 60,000. Apparently airliners can't go that high. My question is why?

Is itdue to the thin nature of air that high?

Thanks!!!
4 beautiful minds| [great minds think alike]

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